Open mellow tree skiing to a tight, rocky, technical way into King's

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

Joel's is a great line for later in the season.

It has mellow tree powder in the uppermost part, then turns into a hanging snowfield before becoming a technical no fall sneak into King's.

Joel's holds great snow most of the year, but the sneak into King's can be very dicey, even in high snow.

Head past Z from the Schlasman's Hike, or just South of Conehead's or King's from the Bridger hike to find the wide spaced trees that are the top of Joel's.

Once here, bask in the easy powder skiing that you have before entering the gnar.

As you start to see the East rock butress of King's, go right into a hanging snowfield, this is where it gets exciting.

Enjoy the last couple pow turns as you fade right and then drop back left when you see the flutes and small chutes that lead into King's.

Make your way down these carefully with the knowledge that the snow in King's may be more sun affected then what is underfoot.

Then exit King's any way you see fit.