An open snowfield that chokes down into a dog leg chute

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

The south face of Naya Nuki peak is a beautiful wide open snowfield that can be seen as you drive north through Bridger canyon.

It stands proud in the sun, begging to have tracks set upon it.

The line starts out from the top as a very wide open bowl of a little over 30 degrees.

After arcing wide open turns for about 600 feet, you have to shut it down, and prepare for the roll over into a fairly tight chute.

This roller steepens to the higher 30 degrees as the fall line constricts to about 25 feet, sometimes less, sometimes more.

Once through the tight spot, the line converges with a South facing, wide open chute.

Bank an easy right turn and you'll have another 500 feet of great skiing down to the flats.

Put skins on, and walk to the north and east, following the Fairy Lake 500 trail, to get back to Fairy Lake.

To get to Naya Nuki, park at the Fairy Lake trailhead, about 1.5 miles from the highway.

Head up the (closed in winter) Fairy Lake Road and up the summer trail to Sacajawea.

Keep going South on the ridge to Nya Nuki.