A number of chutes become skiable in the cliffs above Twin Lakes. Snow depth will determine which of these will work and which won’t but on big years there’s upwards of 8 different lines, depending on how rowdy you’re looking to get.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

-0.0

km

0

m

159

m

58

max°

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

Follow the direction to get to Hole in the Wall and drop in earlier or later.

Access Y chute from the end of Dragon’s Tail.

A number of chutes become skiable in the cliffs above Twin Lakes.

Snow depth will determine which of these will work and which won’t but on big years there’s upwards of 8 different lines, depending on how rowdy you’re looking to get.

The Alphabet Chutes are not in the Ski Area Boundary so there is NO lift access from the bottom.

Y chute is probably the most aesthetic of these chutes, but can also be tricky to find.

It sits looker’s right and usually is the first to have snow filled in.

Some of these chutes end with mandatory air and while usually not massive, the variable snow conditions (see Hole in the Wall) can make for a rude awakening upon landing.