The renowned Fort William World Cup Downhill Track is an iconic test piece for the best downhill MTB racers from around the world!

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

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475

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Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade describes the potential consequences of falling or slipping off the path.

Low Exposure: The path is on completely flat land and potential injury is limited to falling over.

Medium Exposure: The trail contains some obstacles such as outcroppings and rock which could cause injury.

High Exposure: Some trail sections have exposed ledges or steep ascents/descents where falling could cause serious injury.

Extreme Exposure: Some trail sections are extremely exposed where falling will almost certainly result in serious injury or death.

Extreme ExposureSome trail sections are extremely exposed where falling will almost certainly result in serious injury or death.

Description

Nevis Range boasts the only official World Cup Downhill track in the UK.

Each year the pros descend on the challenging course on Aonach Mor for an epic weekend of racing.

Visit the centre between May and September, and you too can tackle this famous track! Heading up in the Nevis Range gondola, you pass directly over much of the Downhill track so you have the perfect opportunity to check out the 2.82km course.

After exiting the top station of the gondola, head across to the new wooden start hut.

Here you're at an altitude of 655m above sea level, and on a good day you'll be met with an incredible view of Fort William, Loch Linnhe and Loch Eil, which is sure to take your breath away.

The top section of the course is set on the open, exposed mountainside.

As you ride down you'll encounter fast, sweeping turns.

As you come to the boardwalks, your body will have a brief moment to recover before getting straight back in to the technical sections.

Immediately after the long boardwalks you'll hit a tough rock garden which is sure to test you.

Shortly after, you'll cross under the gondola line and be met with another rock garden.

Following this, you have a smoother section, with a couple of long slab rocks. After passing through the deer fence, you'll come in to the woods section.

It's at this point that you may experience the infamous Highland midge, so it's a good idea to have some eye protection.

The track begins to change to a dirt surface, but there are rocks scattered all over the track to keep you on your toes.

You'll reach the forrest access road, which is a good opportunity to stop and catch your breath.

You'll also see the massive Big Doon road gap, which is used for the World Cup. Once you're ready, cross the forrest road and set off again.

You'll come to the massive Silverline wall-ride, before reaching the flatter section of the woods.

Here you'll need to be on the pedals to keep your pace up.

If you're up to it, then you can hit the Hazzard Hoofer river jump.

At approximately 4 metres across, it will need commitment! There is a chicken route around if necessary. Soon after, you'll spot the gondola line running above you again.

After the massive hip jump, you're in to the Motorway - a long straight section, with some seriously huge tabletop jumps.

You might want to show off here, to make the riders heading up in the gondola jealous! The track will drop away for one final steep section, from which you'll be able to see the finish a couple of hundred metres away.

This is your last chance to pick up the pace, before you hit the last couple of drops as you come in to the Nevis Range car park.

Once finished, turn around and look up the track in awe - you've just completed 555m of vertical descent on one of the toughest World Cup courses around!