A complicated isolated glacial peak with amazing views.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

The Weissmies is one the best and most famous of all the obvious 4000m peaks that can be easily climbed on skis.

Not only do you get staggering views of the numerous other 4000m peaks nearby, but also to the E and S you look down onto the Italian plains, often above a cloud inversion below.

There are 2 ways to approach this summit, from opposite sides of the mountain, with pros and cons.

This way is from the Hohsaas lift from Saas Grund to 3100m, saving you a huge amount of vertical height gain.

It does however need you to skin under threatening seracs.

The alternative route, requiring an extra day, avoids this in ascent, traversing the mountain.

This is separately described and involves a night in the winter room of the Almageller Hut- solitude guaranteed! If unacclimatised it is best to book into the Hohsaas Hut to get an early start, but fit/acclimatised parties can do this as a daytrip off the first lift.

You will have time to do the Alllalinhorn in the morning and get to the Hohsaas Hut that night if you are fit and acclimatised.

Best to seek local information from the Guides Office or from the hut guardians as to the state of the seracs on this route, as on occasion they can be quite menacing.

Initially you follow the red piste down onto the glacier, then put your skins on and follow what will probably be a well established track.

Make sure you time your rest stops so you are not in any serac danger, fairly obvious where this is, as it steepens up.

Above there is more mellow skinning and increasingly amazing views towards the top.

Descent is the reverse of your ascent route.