The classic of Lone Lake Cirque.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

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m

560

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44

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Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

For a beautiful long chute ski the Mullet.

This is a classic on the Lone Lake Cirque and if it is your first time back there a great place to start.

Access to this run is dependent on snow level and conditions, sometimes there is very little rock to step over and other times you have to side step over long sections of loose rock off the top of of the west ridge of Lone Mountain.

The Mullet is the less steep run, but 2,000 ft of vertical.

It is also the widest of the chutes on the Lone Lake area.

However, do not ski this frivolously, make sure to go with someone who knows the area and follow the snow conditions and avalanche reports at least a week out to fully understand conditions in the area.

Though wide steep and glorious there are no great/safe stopping points, ski this run top to bottom and one at a time.

You will finish in near the lake, but do not stop in any place it looks like a slide path.

At the bottom there is a boot pack skiers right which will take you back to Moonlight Basin.

Understand at the top of the boot pack you are still in the backcountry and when you ski out there are slopes that are capable of sliding remain aware and use good judgment.