A popular descent in Cornrows section of the Lone Lake Cirque

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

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Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

The first Cornrows is one of many rocky chutes in the Lost Lake Cirque.

It's a super fun line, but it can end in a cliff.

The size of the cliff is dependent on the amount of snow fall that Big Sky has had that year.

Identifying this line takes excellent route finding and requires good terrain identification.

The entrance to Cornrows 1 is dependent on snow levels and conditions.

Often walking or side stepping on loose rocks down a steep face is necessary to get to the snow.

Once you are in the line, the terrain is quite steep for about 2,000 vertical feet.

The width of the chute is snow dependent, but it is usually wide enough to make turns the entire time.

There are no safe zones on this line so ski it top to bottom.

A mandatory cliff is located at the bottom of this line before the apron.

In a big snow year, it can be skied over, but you won't know unless you ski with someone who knows this terrain and skis it regularly.

Another option is to ski across the rocky ridge into Cornrows 2 for a clean line to the bottom of the cirque.

Ski all the way to Lost Lake and do not stop in any unsafe avalanche paths.

A boot pack on skiers right near the trees takes you back to the Forest Service Wall above the North Summit Snowfield.

One last short descent in terrain that is capable of avalanching is required to take you back into the Big Sky Ski Area boundary.