This north-facing chute starts in the open and doglegs through the trees.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

261

m

44

max°

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

High Exposure (E3)In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Description

On a powder day, a skin track or boot pack can almost always be seen in Dogleg from the ski area.

This is a popular backcountry run, complete with cornices, cliffs, and glades.

While Dog Leg is within Silver Basin, it is beyond the ski area boundary and is not mitigated with explosives.

This is a steep chute and can easily avalanche.

Proper avalanche equipment is a must on this run.

Approach either from Silver Basin via Chair 6 or by skinning/hiking from the top of Quicksilver Chair through the Silver Basin return trail.

Watch out for oncoming traffic and stay to the side.

Skin to the top of this narrow chute through the glades and open terrain just north of this narrow chute.

If the chute itself is sloughed out, the uptrack bowl often offers great turns.

But if the narrow chute is what you're after, drop in carefully.

A few trees choke the upper chute and must be navigated.

While the chute is wide enough to link turns, it feels narrow and intimidating.

Thanks to trees and rocks shading the chute, the snow often stays soft days after a storm.

Below the chute the terrain opens again into a beautiful glade.

Pick up your skin track again for another lap.