Day 1: The amazing Jungfraujoch railway accessing the biggest glaciated area in Europe and our first ski peak on the way to the hut.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

High Exposure (E3)In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Description

Whilst it is possible to come into the Oberland by other means this is by far the simplest, quickest and least effort.

The railway itself is a historic journey itself through the very heart of the Eiger.

You can get out of the train at various points and look through windows onto the N Face of the Eiger, before eventually arriving at the Jungfraujoch, which is our access point onto the glaciers.

The highly commercialised top station of the railway is quickly left behind you as you exit onto the Jungfrafirn glacier.

Our peak for the day is the Louwihorn, 3773m.

Initially you ski gently down in an arc to the S to about 3250m, before putting on skins.

It is a relatively short and gentle skin of about 500m ascent, but it is hard enough as you are probably arriving unacclimatised.

It is a small peak that lies on a ridge to the S of the mighty Jungfrau, 4158m.

The descent is beautiful open slopes to the SE, keeping close to the steep slopes of Kranzberg to your L.

It flattens off towards Konkordiaplatz, followed by a long climb up ladders to the Konkordia Hut, 2850m