Steep hike on a wide trail to the tallest summit above Breckenridge Ski Resort.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade describes the potential consequences of falling or slipping off the path.

Low Exposure: The path is on completely flat land and potential injury is limited to falling over.

Medium Exposure: The trail contains some obstacles such as outcroppings and rock which could cause injury.

High Exposure: Some trail sections have exposed ledges or steep ascents/descents where falling could cause serious injury.

Extreme Exposure: Some trail sections are extreme exposed where falling will almost certainly result in serious injury or death.

Medium ExposureThe trail contains some obstacles such as outcroppings and rock which could cause injury.

Description

Peak 10, at 13,639 feet, is the tallest of the five mountains that form Breckenridge Ski Resort.

It is the southernmost of these, all part of the impressive Tenmile Range.

It’s summit is therefore one of the best views around, and is understandably popular.

Multiple routes reach the top, but the most straightforward is the service road that ascends from the ski area.

This is the Peak 10 Trail, also known as East Ridge.

If the resort is still open, you can even take a lift to get part of the way up, assuming backcountry access is open. The route is most often done in summer, when snow free.

You park in the ski area, which is open for hiking and bike access, and walk from there.

Take County Road 751 (Peak 9 Road) past The Overlook Restaurant.

You can generally park at the top of the ski lifts.

4WD vehicles can go farther, but this is considered the start of the hike.

You essentially follow the road up the ridge to the top.

The road ends just shy of the summit where you walk across a few hundred feet of talus to earn the real views. From the top you can see 360 degrees: the Tenmile Range stretching away on either side, the Gore Range farther north, the Mosquito Range farther south, and more mountains unfolding in all directions.

A high saddle connects Peak 10 to Crystal Peak, so some choose to cross this and link the two.

To descend, you can return the way you came or make a longer loop through the Crystal Creek drainage and Spruce Creek Trail. Sources: https://www.summitpost.org/peak-10/153047 https://www.alltrails.com/explore/trail/us/colorado/peak-10-trail