A very narrow chute for experienced experts only.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

High Exposure (E3)In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Description

Like many of the gnarliest lines at Crystal, L Dub is little known.

In fact, most people are probably not familiar with the name.

More commonly, it is referred to as "the tiny couloir that cuts through the Horseshoe Headwall." The Headwall is the largest rocky buttress that anchors the looker's right side of Horseshoe Cliffs.

A cable attached to a tree here is used for avalanche control by the ski patrol.

L Dub cuts through the Headwall below the summit cliff at a diagonal.

Enter not from the top of the Headwall, as this would require a thirty foot drop to a snowy ledge and another twenty foot drop into L Dub.

Instead enter from Paradise Chute #3, staying right and finding the slot through the rocks below the headwall.

The steepest and most challenging section of this run happens in the first few turns below the headwall.

Depending on snow level it might be required to straight-line this short section.

Once below the headwall the slope opens wide to a broad apron.

Watch for avalanche debris and traverse tracks coming in from the left.

Note that once through Gate 6, cliffs and other hazards are not marked in Northway.

This slope avalanches regularly.

Carry the proper equipment and ski/ride with a partner.

At the bottom of the apron, hit Otto Bahn back to the bottom of Northway Chair.