An open face that quickly enters young trees and a series of chutes halfway down.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

0

m

179

m

39

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Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

From the top of Silver King, drop into the steep, open face towards Silver Basin.

Watch for a large cornice that forms at the top.

The upper section of this face is steep and often avalanches.

When the snow is deep, it often covers the young trees that form below this steep section.

In recent years, these trees are growing and choking off much of the terrain.

Snake through this short treed section to two steep chutes halfway down the run, called SE Right #2 and Sharkfin Right.

This is where the fun starts.

Pick your line carefully, as all of these chutes are rocky at the top.

Once into the chutes, they open to a nice face that offers several hundred vertical of often-untracked snow.

This is one of the longest vertical runs in Silver Basin at approximately 1000 feet from the summit of Silver King to the groomed outrun.