After a strenuous hike, this open run through trees makes for a spectacular day.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

0 - 1

hrs

3

m

622

m

36

max┬░

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

This long, rolling, wide-open face sits above the Crystal Mountain base area, across from the ski area.

East Peak faces the sun, offering spring-like conditions even when the rest of the peaks are still in powder.

Watch for avalanches and carry the proper equipment.

This is true backcountry and avalanche mitigation is not done.

If rescue is necessary, you may be charged.

Follow a cat track from the base area into the trees to the climber's left of the Gold Hills chair.

After a two switchbacks, look for the summer trail leading to the left.

Use the trail to get above the road to an old ski trail.

Avoid the summer trail to the left for the uptrack as it traverses under avalanche terrain.

Instead, stay to the right on the old ski run and make your way through the thick trees in the creek below East Peak.

Once above the steep creek bed, the view opens again.

The best terrain for skinning can be found on either the far climber's left or right, avoiding the cliffs in the middle.

Once at the top, enjoy the spectacular view of Crystal Mountain.

On a clear day Mount Rainier rises above the ski area.

On a calm night, locals often camp out at the top of the peak.

Once at the top the fun is only beginning.

Choose from a myriad of lines in the wide-open face.

During storms or right after a big snowfall, avoid the cross-loaded cornice that builds on the north flank of the face, known locally as Ted's Buttress.

Return to the base area along the same cat track you used on the way up.

Look out for snowmobiles and snowcats accessing the private homes at the top of Gold Hills.