8 adventures

Doolin to Fanore

Doolin to Fanore

County Clare
20.0 km348 m332 m
Walk through the beautiful irish countryside along some rural roads and past farms. You will have a nice view over the Aran Islands and the Burren!
Difficult
Private
Fanore to Ballyvaughan

Fanore to Ballyvaughan

County Clare
21.6 km351 m371 m
Beautiful and very diversified walk from Fanore to Ballyvaughan. You walk through almost every type of terrain today.
Severe
Private
Ballyvaughan Wood Loop Walk

Ballyvaughan Wood Loop Walk

County Clare
10.4 km118 m119 m
This circuit walk through the woods of Ballyvaughan brings you to the mystic Aillwee Cave.
Difficult
Private
Liscannor to Doolin

Liscannor to Doolin

County Clare
19.2 km1,001 m987 m
Beautiful coastal path along the impressive cliffs of Moher with outstanding views.
Severe
Private
Ballycuggeran Loop

Ballycuggeran Loop

County Clare
7.1 km260 m260 m
Beautiful looped walking trail with panoramic views of Lough Derg
Moderate
Private
Burren Way

Burren Way

County Clare
184.2 km12,993 m13,015 m
The Burren Way is a 123km walking trail in the North West corner of County Clare. The trail is marked in both directions and you can start in Lahinch or Corofin or from one of the spurs in Ballyvaughan or Tubber.
Difficult
Private
Balyvaughan Wood loop

Balyvaughan Wood loop

County Clare
8.9 km68 m68 m
This loop starts in the village of Ballyvaughan - a walkers welcome town and takes you close to Aillwee Cave - the most famous of the ancient caves beneath the Burren.
Moderate
Private
Black Head

Black Head

County Clare
20.8 km560 m560 m
* By the bare world of Burren * South of Galway Bay is one of Ireland's most peculiar landscapes: the Burren limestone plateau. The name "Burren" is derived from the Gaelic "boireann", which means rocky place. In fact, the Burren is a vast karst area, with large areas of bare limestone, interspersed with countless cracks and ditches. The furrows form on flat rock, where the rainwater can only drain off slowly or not at all and therefore eats its way into the rock over time. While the surface of the plateau remains bare, humus collects in the ditches, on which a diverse flora grows, taking advantage of the protection and special microclimate of this tiny habitat. However, Neolithic graves and Celtic ring forts like the Cathair Dhuin Irghius prove that the "Burren" was not always so bare. After the Ice Age, the "Burren" was covered by a light forest, which people cleared over time, exposing the thin humus layer to erosion and finally eroding it over large areas. This is how the unique landscape that we experience today was created.
Private