If you're looking for great long powder runs, this is one of the finest around!

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Low Exposure (E1)Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Description

The Wasatch is known for powder and Bonkers is one of the classic powder runs.

To access, start at the Broads Fork Trailhead in Big Cottonwood Canyon, follow the summer trail through the trees until you pop out at the base, then skin up.

Bonkers was a favorite powder haunt of the helicopter ski operations back before this area was designated as wilderness.

Now it's only available to the backcountry skiers willing to put in the time and effort to hike in to it.

It's a very worthwhile run if you're looking for a long, wide, open area with plenty of room to turn.

It's a pretty straightforward ascent and descent with most parties putting in a nice tight skin track up the lookers right to gain the ridge.

The upper slopes are in the mid to upper 30 degree range, then it mellows out quickly to a very enjoyable powder skipping pitch.

If you ski all the way down to the flats it's nearly 2,000 feet long! A great spot to put in a few laps, but tricky to navigate when it's cloudy since there aren't any trees to help with visibility.