Often wind affected, this slope, while short, can provide perfect conditions on its day and takes some time to get tracked out.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

18

m

381

m

41

max°

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

The width of this slope is what makes it so enjoyable.

You could spend a whole day going up and down it and never ski exactly the same line.

Although it gets smashed by the wind, if it’s still then this slope can be magic.

Getting to it requires a high traverse to the left of the steep section of the Col du Vent piste followed by a short hike (10 metres or so) up to the ridge above and the slope’s entry point.

Once there, pick your line.

It is mostly obvious from above where you can go but if in doubt, check the slope out from the Eychauda piste below first.

There is the odd rock and ridge to break up the slope but route finding is pretty straightforward.

Although not as classic as some of the lines in this area, Catex can be a good option once the nearby Neyzets and Montagnolle get tracked out.

Or just if you’d like to try something different.