Short, steep and narrow to get the adrenaline pumping.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

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Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

Rush Chute is a steep, narrow chute that opens onto a large apron.

It is perfect for going fast and getting a good "rush." At the top, before getting into the chute itself, there is a significant convexity.

The route also has an eastern aspect, meaning it is regularly wind loaded.

Avalanche danger here is significant, and if anything does move it will likely funnel into Rush Chute.

Be very aware of the avalanche risk before deciding to drop into Rush Chute. The chute itself is quite short, but requires at least a small amount of straight lining through the choke.

The chute opens up into a wide apron, making it an ideal route to go fast.

After the chute there is plenty of space to shut down your speed if you need to. Aside from skiing straight through the chute, it is also possible to air into the chute from the skier's left or right.

Either drop is approximately 10-15 feet, and it can add a new wrinkle to the fun of skiing Rush Chute.