A thrilling descent that James Bond would be proud of

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs…) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Medium Exposure (E2)As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

Description

On arrival at the Schilthorn don't head out of the normal skier exit.

Instead head up onto the viewing terrace and be sure to have a look at the view! Then head down the small steps that are cordoned off with a warning to take care.

(This descent is not for the faint hearted or those inexperienced in off-piste).

There you can put on your skis and head down a large steep snowfield, bearing gently left to avoid the cliffed areas and towards the ridge line for approximately 300 metres.

There is real danger if you stay right and close to the line of the cable car as cliffs can cause problems, so it is advisable to do this route after a few skiers have already taken the route.

After the long snow field, the trail narrows and some short radius turns are required to negotiate a narrow rocky area.

From there it opens out again and you can traverse along for as long as desired before dropping in for a good 25 turns and then rejoining the Schilthorn Piste just at the start of the long traverse.

This should not be attempted immediately after a heavy snowfall due to avalanche risk but offers one of the best expert freeride runs in the area.