Two Ocean Lake

Grand Teton National Park

An easy, yet scenic, 10k trail run around a glacial lake with an abundance of wildlife.

Trail Running Easy

Distance
9.9 km
Ascent
125 m
Descent
125 m
Low Point
2.1 km
High Point
2.1 km
Gradient
VIEW ON MAP
Two Ocean Lake Map

Description

Just a few miles north of Moran Junction, this easy ~10k run around Two Ocean Lake offers impressive views of the Teton skyline, the high peaks of Mount Mora,n and Grand Teton clearly distinguishable from the rest. Formed by glacial activity, the surface of the lake rests at nearly 6,900' above sea level, many of the visible mountain peaks towering well above 12,000'.

As with most lakeside loops in Grand Teton National Park, counter-clockwise is the preferred direction for the best views. Wildlife, especially bear, moose, coyote, and elk, are prevalent around the lake, and the National Park explicitly warns of their dangers. Though there have been no fatal bear encounters, there are a handful of documented attacks since the 1990s. While the park recommends carrying bear spray, bear bells and other similar noisemakers may also help to deter encounters.

Two Ocean Lake "was named for Two Ocean Pass about 25 miles (40 km) to the northeast where Atlantic Creek flows east and Pacific Creek flows west," according to Wikipedia. However, they continue to state how "the name is a misnomer," as the lake itself flows solely into Pacific Creek. Due to the unusual phenomenon, Two Ocean Pass was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1965 and is often referenced in western films and novels.

This run is extremely easy to follow and has very little elevation gain. At the northernmost point of the loop, you'll reach a junction with the Grand View Point Trail. Many suggest a side trip to its namesake vista, though the 1-mile detour includes a stout 600-foot climb that would significantly increase the difficulty of the run.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PartingoftheWaters http://www.tetonhikingtrails.com/two-ocean-lake-loop.htm

Difficulty

Easy

Low Exposure

1 out of 4

The path is on completely flat land and potential injury is limited to falling over.

Remoteness

2 out of 4

Away from help but easily accessed.

Best time to visit

April, May, June, July, August, September, October

Similar routes nearby

Guidebooks in this area