Guidebook

Climbing Annapurna, the World's 10th-Highest Peak

Annapurna in the Himalayas is one of the hardest mountains to climb in the world.

Description

Located in the Himalayas in north-central Nepal, Annapurna I is the only peak in the Annapurna massif over 8,000 meters (26,000 feet). In 1950 Maurice Herzog led a French expedition to its summit, making it the first of the eight-thousanders to be climbed.

The entire massif and the surrounding area are protected within the 7,629 sq km (2,946 sq mi) Annapurna Conservation Area, the first and largest conservation area in Nepal. The Annapurna Conservation Area is home to several world-class treks, including the Annapurna Sanctuary and the Annapurna Circuit.

Annapurna has a fatal reputation and is known as one of the hardest mountains to climb. This fatality-to-summit ratio (1:3.1, or 32%) is the highest of any of the eight-thousanders.

In 2019, Rupert Jones-Warner became the youngest Brit to summit Annapurna.
https://www.rupertjoneswarner.com

Annapurna Summit push!

Annapurna Summit push!

4.6 km
922 m
After spending several weeks slowly acclimatising on the mountain, we are making our final push for the summit. Usually a trek to a higher altitude would be considered pretty strenuous but because we had acclimatised out bodies had adjusted and it was ok. A rather daunting send off, Annapurna has a fatal reputation.
Moderate
Private
Camp 1 to Camp 2

Camp 1 to Camp 2

1.9 km
452 m
Glacier Crossing
Moderate
Private
Camp 2 to Camp 3

Camp 2 to Camp 3

2.0 km
960 m
The most arduous, dangerous and beautiful part of the climb.
Severe
Private
Camp 3 to Camp 4

Camp 3 to Camp 4

0.7 km
427 m
What I thought was going to be a short climb ended up being a bit of a slog!
Severe
Private
Annapurna Summit Day

Annapurna Summit Day

1.6 km
1,090 m
Fortunately, summit day couldn't have had better conditions. There was no wind and blue skies (mostly). Had the weather been anything other than this it would have certainly changed the difficulty rating to extreme. That said, we were climbing into the Death Zone where there is a third of the oxygen than at sea level. Climbed through the night which is always cold and seems to go on forever but all was well! Then we had a long trek to the summit which we arrived at about 3pm. This is usually later than usual on an '8,000er' but we were held up by deep snow. All went well though despite the odds!
Severe
Private