The upper basin leading you into options in the Gemstone Bowl - Sapphire, Diamond and Ruby

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

0

m

29

m

21

max┬░

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Description

After reaching the top of the Spanky's Ladder boot pack, you've just entered into some of the best lift-accessed terrain in North America.

At this point, you have a few options as there are many lines in this zone, some more intimidating and hazardous than others.

Garnet Bowl is just the beginning - this line will funnel you into Sapphire, Ruby or Diamond Bowl.

As a result, the direction you take here is important.

Garnet itself is the short, and most likely the least intimidating portion of the Gemstone Bowls that you will ski.

It is simply a wide open upper basin with no real cliff hazard (which doesn't mean you should not exercise caution!).

You will want to choose your line from here - a traverse to the right will lead you to Sapphire (the most challenging of the tree and the hardest to get into), keeping left will lead you to Ruby Bowl (a good line to start with) and keeping straight will have you ending up in Diamond bowl (giving you the least amount of traversing needed, but still the most vertical opportunity).

Garnet is significantly less steep than the line options you are staring down lower in the Gemstone bowls, so use this as an opportunity to get familiar with the terrain before descending further.

Powder can last for days after a storm here, but also be wary of variable conditions which will make this area dangerous.

This is an avalanche controlled, technically inbounds area and therefore it can remain closed at times due to safety concerns.

However, despite its designation as inbounds, skiing the upper basin and descending lower into more challenging lines requires expert skiing ability and should not be taken lightly.

This short line begins at the top of the gate and hangs a left, at this point one can choose their next move from there into their line (either left, center or right).