Steep challenging couloirs for experts only.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

5

m

712

m

45

max°

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Description

If you want to do really ambitious runs in steep terrain then these are your lines in Mayrhofen.

Take the 150er cablecar to the top and when exiting follow the long ridge the N, this part is really flat so you need to hike or pole for a little way, but it will be worth the effort.

When the hill beside the ridge turns to the right after 300 m, you can have a look down into the couloirs here and decide which one you are going to take.

The steepness grows from the E to the N facing couloirs, some are tighter than the others, so might get quickly tracked out after not many skiers.

If you are not sure about it because it’s too difficult, too tracked out or the avalanche safety doesn’t allow it, you can head over to the W and do an easier run down into the valley. Otherwise be prepared for an adrenalin kick, enjoy the snow in the couloirs and ski one at a time, regrouping in islands of safety to minimise avalanche danger. At the bottom the best spot to regroup is a few meters away from the small river in the valley.

Then follow the E face of Wanglspitz in the direction of the 150er.

The best days with powder are from January to March.

If it is warmer it is possible to ski one of the sunnier more E facing lines in soft spring snow in the morning.