Great low-angle powder skiing past historic mining structures.

Statistics

2 - 3

hrs

436

m

436

m

32

max°

Difficulty

FATMAP difficulty grade

Moderate

Description

Trestle Shot, located in the stunning Alta Lakes basin, is the easiest backcountry ski tour in the area.

Just outside the boundaries of Telluride Ski Resort, this tour takes only a couple hours to complete, and provides excellent powder skiing on north-facing slopes that stay cold and dry throughout the ski season.

It can be combined with other ski runs in the basin, or lapped from the same skin track for multiple runs.

And, you are surrounded by the towering walls of Palmyra Peak and Silver Mountain for the entire tour, in a true alpine paradise.

The aprons and bowls of the peaks themselves can be skied along this tour, but for beginners, it is best to stick to the low-angled, easily accessible, and unexposed slopes of the Trestle Shot.

This run rises directly off the highest lake in the Alta Lakes group, and features an old mining cart track that departs from the slope and juts out into the sky near the bottom of the ski run.

While the wooden structure is easily avoided, it adds a historical perspective to touring in the area.

Any ski trip in Telluride would be incomplete without skiing past relics of the area’s mining history, which appear in stark contrast to the beautiful alpine scenery that the area is known for today.

This tour is accessed from the backcountry access point between the top of the Prospect Lift and Bald Mountain.

From here, the route descends and traverses southeast to the highest of the Alta Lakes.

The trestle itself and the Alta Lakes observatory, a beautiful and luxurious backcountry hut, are located on the south side of this lake.

The run itself is an open bowl with plenty of room for tracks, located directly above the hut and the trestle.

Usually, the skin track is located to the lookers right of the trestle and the bowl, following a line of trees to the top of the ski run.

Lap the bowl until it’s tracked out, or venture higher into the basin for a longer second run if avalanche conditions allow.

And when you’ve had enough, reverse your tracks back into Telluride Ski Resort.