Day 5: Traverse of Col Durand and descent to Zermatt.

Statistics

Analysing terrain data

1

day +

1,234

m

2,507

m

31

max┬░

Exposure

Exposure

The exposure grade does not take into account objective hazards (stone fall, seracs, etc) but only the consequences of the skier falling.

Low Exposure (E1): Exposure is limited to that of the slope itself. Getting hurt is still likely if the slope is steep and/or the snow is hard.

Medium Exposure (E2): As well as the slope itself, there are some obstacles (such as rock outcrops) which could aggravate injury.

High Exposure (E3): In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Extreme Exposure (E4): In case of a fall, the skier faces certain death.

In case of a fall, death is highly likely.

Description

This is another great mountain day with an optional extra summit, Mt Durand if so desired. From the hut descend to the SE, E and then S onto the Durand Glacier.

Follow gently up the glacier to the SW on its R side in ascent, then S, flattening at about 3200m, before turning to the E, then back S as it steepens to Col Durand at 3436m.

This final slope is about 40 degrees for a short distance and may be icy.

Many people will want to take in the summit of Mont Durand which adds an extra hours climb, partly on foot, partly on ski.

Ski down the Hohwang Glacier, gently initially.

There is a direct descent to the Schonbiel Hut from the R hand side of the glacier in descent but it is steep and S facing.

Less committing is to skin up an additional 180m to the saddle at 3408m, N of the Abihorn.

Next descend the Arben Glacier to the NE, then slowly arcing round to the S, avoiding occasional bit of steep ground, heading to the L in descent of the obvious spur in the valley below until the flat ground on the lateral moraine of the old Zmutt Glacier.

Look for the track that comes up from below and follow it past the reservoirs and down R to join the pistes that lead down to Zermatt.