A beautiful journey along the Anglo-Welsh border

Statistics

1

day +

7,093

m

7,118

m

6

max┬░

Difficulty

FATMAP difficulty grade

Difficult

Description

Offa's Dyke is a large linear earthwork in Britain that roughly follows the border between England and Wales.

It was built during the late 8th century, possibly by King Offa of Mercia, as a means of defining and defending the kingdom's frontier.

The Offa's Dyke path is a long-distance footpath that runs along the course of the dyke, offering walkers a chance to explore the beautiful countryside and rich history of the area. The path passes through a variety of landscapes, including rolling hills, river valleys, and historic towns and villages, offering a diverse and scenic hiking experience. Offa's Dyke can be done in either direction but we've drawn it going north from Sedbury Cliffs near Chepstow in South Wales to Prestatyn on the North Wales coast, right on the shore of the Irish Sea.

It's a long trail but lined with lovely villages and towns, so it's a simple journey logistically and you'll rarely struggle to find a warm bed and a good feed.

Some of the areas it passes through are popular tourist spots, so booking your accommodation a day or 2 in advance - when you've got an up to date forecast - is well advised, especially at weekends. The trail typically takes 2 weeks to complete and in the course of that time you'll cross the Anglo-Welsh border over 20 times, and pass through 8 different counties! You'll also pass some high and barren mountains (which can be savage places to be in bad weather) and calm, flat sections of riverside trail.

The variety of the Offa's Dyke is part of its appeal, and the satisfaction of going sea to sea, traveling the entire length of a country, is wonderful.