The plum steep ski line of Mount Cheops

Statistics

0 - 1

hrs

170

m

742

m

51

max°

Difficulty

FATMAP difficulty grade

Extreme

Description

Roger’s pass is one of North America’s premier ski touring destinations.

At 1,330 meters elevation, Roger’s Pass is the most spectacular section of the Trans Canada Highway cutting through the heart of BC.

Starting from the parking at the visitor’s center, the terrain to the north of Cheops Mountain provides some of the best quality and most quickly accessed ski touring in the area.

Mount Cheops offers a few awesome ski lines, and none more so than its impressive North Face.

This is certainly one of the more technical lines in the area and unlike most of the other ski descents in the North Cheops area, it may require some ropework and ski mountaineering knowhow.

The descent is also continually steep and quite exposed at the top.

It is vital to be sure of the snow stability before dropping in.

The line can be climbed but it is quicker and easier to skin up around the west flank of the mountain as for the line on North 5 Chute. The entrance may require a short down climb to get into.

The top of the descent is on an open face averaging 45 degrees and is exposed over cliffs below.

Trend skiers’ right side down this face until it is possible to cut hard left through a rocky band.

In good conditions it is not a problem to ski through here without using the rope.

The original line took the couloir straight down (lookers’ left side in the photo), however there is an ice step in the middle of this couloir that will need to be rappelled.

Instead, it makes more sense to take the other couloir (lookers’ right side in the photo) which skis cleanly all the way to the bottom.

This line gives a truly awesome descent down continually interesting terrain mostly around 45 degrees the whole way.

It is a very serious line and should only be attempted by experienced ski mountaineers who have a solid understanding of the current snow conditions.

The BC snowpack and weather patterns can be highly changeable and dynamic.