Baden Powell Trail

The complete Baden Powell Trail from Horseshoe Bay to Deep Cove

Trail Running Difficult

Distance
45 km
Ascent
2.5 km
Descent
2.6 km
Duration
1 day +
Low Point
9 m
High Point
1.2 km
Gradient
22˚
Baden Powell Trail Map

The Baden Powell Trail (BPT) offers a marathon-distance trail run that crosses from Horseshoe Bay on Howe Sound to Deep Cove on Indian Arm. The trail is a North Vancouver classic and is a must-run for those visiting the city. The trail is stunningly beautiful and equally challenging. It travels between sea level and the summit of Black Mountain.

Description

Like many Pacific Northwest trails, the BPT is technical and challenging with miles of rooty, rocky and lush singletrack. These trails are well known for their technicality. Their difficulty helps hone focus so as not to miss footing and stumble over the myriad roots and rocks. It is densely forested with cedar, hemlock, and Douglas fir trees, as the trail runs across and around the base of Eagle Bluff, Black Mountain, Cypress Mountain, Grouse Mountain, Mount Fromme, Mount Seymour, and all the way running parallel and nearby the urban edge of the city.

The BPT is signed along the route by blazes on trees and numerous posts at intersections and entrances. Runners can enter and exit the trail throughout its entirety across West Vancouver and North Vancouver, making the trail extremely accessible and also close to amenities at multiple points. Runners can expect to have cellular service throughout the trail. The eastern end, at Deep Cove, has access to numerous cafes, shops, and restaurants.

The trail also is well known for the 50km Knee Knackering North Shore Run which courses across the entire BPT and has celebrated 30 years’ running – a testament to the draw of the BPT. In short, this is a must-do trail if you have a full day to trail run in Vancouver!

Estimated 6-12 hours to complete full trail. Shorter sections and segments will require less time and are distance-dependent.

Difficulty

Difficult

Low Exposure

1 out of 4

The path is on completely flat land and potential injury is limited to falling over.

Remoteness

1 out of 4

Close to help in case of emergency.

Best time to visit

March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November

Similar routes nearby

Guidebooks in this area